Amish made hardwood

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 Post subject: Critique my DIY installation
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 1:44 pm 
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I finished my first DIY installation of a Bruce Glenn Cove Saddle 3/8" engineered wood floor. It was a glue down on the concrete slab. Next weekend I'll be installing more in the formal living room. All you experts please take a look at the pictures and critique my install. Let me know of anything the pros would have done differently. I'd love your feedback before next weekend when I start the next room.

http://img428.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img17338zg.jpg

http://img390.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img17344io.jpg

http://img428.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img17354qz.jpg

http://img428.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img17361dq.jpg

http://img390.imageshack.us/my.php?image=img17372na.jpg

Thanks!


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Amish made hardwood

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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 1:55 pm 
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Location: Antioch, CA. 94509
Overall, a nice install!. With just pictures, it's hard to tell how flat the job is or if there are any hollows. But I'll just assume that it's flat with no hollow spots. Myself, I'm real particular about where end butts fall. On one photo shot, you had four end butts all together only a couple of inches apart. I see it all the time even on pro jobs so it's quite normal and common. I also noticed end butts lining up and I try to avoid that as well. Like I said, I'm real picky about where the end butts fall. But as I said, overall, the job looks good from an install perspective. I'm not crazy about the actual flooring though. Just my opinion.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 3:03 pm 
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I think you did a good job too. Try to get more of a random appearance going and don't have any butt joints under 6" apart. There are ways to achieve that random look but its more waste.


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 4:15 pm 
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Agreed. Nice work!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 10:31 pm 
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Thanks guys...

One thing I did want to point out. If you look at the top left in first picture you'll barely see a transition piece that leads into the kitchen. I used a brass nail down threshold piece. Is this considered tacky? Should I go and purchase the wood T mold that matches the floor?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 10:38 pm 
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Saw that. Gold flar bar, a lino man's trim. Wood looks better but you need to keep it up. Those thresholds take a beating.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 11, 2006 10:39 pm 
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8)


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PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 4:03 am 
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I looked at the pics again. You did a good job. Actually better than some of the pictures I see.

I didn't see any glue ooze anywhere. Color mix is pretty good, and I noticed you used some darker boards along the walls so the furniture will hide them more.

Work on your stagger, I generally will toss anything under 12" or put them in closets or under an established seating area, bed, ect.

I like the painted quarter round look. Pull that metal up so you won't have to go sit in a corner. :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 5:49 pm 
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Ok, I'll go buy the darn wood threshold.... :wink:

Home Depot just wanted so much $$$ for them. It's special order and like 30 bucks for a 3 foot piece.

Jerry T why do you not like using any that are under 12"? I like how the small ones look when they are in the middle of the floor. Is this typically not good to do?

Thanks


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 6:02 pm 
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You can always make one if you have a router. It will save you $$$$

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 12, 2006 10:07 pm 
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I make mini thresholds using 5/16" oak strip flooring. It is 2" wide by 5/16" thick. I simply bevel, round over, whatever you want to call it both edges and sand it smooth. Then stain and finish it to match and nail it down. Takes about 15 minutes and costs maybe $2.00 Works on transitions that are fairly even with each other.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 3:03 am 
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It's just a preference for me New Guy. On a beveled 4-sided product I just try to avoid having too many out in the field. Nothing wrong with it technically.

Let me put it another way to you. I'm on the job, the homeowners at work, I'm not going to chance using those shorts out in the field because some people can get pretty upset about that.

We get put between a rock and a hard place. I choose the safe route :D .


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Feb 13, 2006 9:49 am 
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hmmm.....

I recently purchased a router I think I'll try to make a threshold.

Thanks for the idea.


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 Post subject: first time installation
PostPosted: Tue Oct 17, 2006 3:56 pm 
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Is it difficult to install flooring? I want to save money on installation and be proud of doing it with help from wife and 22 yr old son. Is there a website/store to learn?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Oct 18, 2006 12:53 am 
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This web site has a lot of instructions that are reliable. Read them over then decide if you are up to it.

http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/hardwo ... ncrete.htm
http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/hardwo ... r/glue.htm
http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/hardwo ... renail.htm
http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/hardwo ... loater.htm
http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/hardwo ... finish.htm
http://www.hardwoodinstaller.com/hardwo ... -pages.htm


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